Agile Practical Tools (JIRA, Trello, Jenkins)

Welcome to the discussion about this lecture. Here you can ask questions or post feedback about this specific lecture.

2 Likes

I was very pleased when I saw that at my current work we are using modern state of the art tools for Agile development: Scrum using Jira, Slack, Jenkins. Our sprints are 2 weeks long. Great to know that my experiences come from modern approaches to development, I just need now to change my field of engagement from classical centralized eCommerce solutions to blockchain (open/close ledger) solutions.

2 Likes

These are all new tools to me except the #slack I heard some where last year from my readings and create and account, and never use it. :laughing: Now I can use these tools to design my own side projects and have fun with them and hope to get good at. Great lecture! :+1:Thank you @ivan.

1 Like

I like the Jenkins tool as it eliminates the traditional time delay where the bugs from testing are only highlighted and distributed after the (human) tester has documented it or after a daily testing triage team meeting.

Interesting lecture even though most was completely new to me. Maybe it’s a software thing.
Having been involved in and had lead over some quiet big development projects we always used Gantt charts as we had timelines that were intertwined and the outcome of one task had an effect on the start of a next phase of work. This is something i do not see in these boards.

1 Like

Gantt charts are not as popular nowadays for a few reasons. As Ivan pointed out in the previous video, it’s more important to adapt to change than to “follow the plan”. The way waterfall projects used Gantt charts was to create the project plan up front and track the plan. And it goes fine until plans change. Using Kanban is way more practical, where requirements change often, new work items pop up, etc.
If you’re doing projects where everything is predictable, Gantt charts can be good. But for software development projects they do more harm than use.

1 Like

This video was very useful to me. I personally have worked with businesses using Trello but had not used it myself. Whilst watching this video I tried Triaga and Trello. Finally realized that Planner in Office 365 has some basic board functionality so I will using this from now on for a Customer Services role do with one of my clients.

1 Like

“Git”, yet another tool that adds to techno babble. I am familiar with it from school but under the proper name of “version control”. How it became “git” is a mystery to me and no, I will not search Google on how lazy Americans came up with yet another acronym to show that they’re in an exclusive tribe. If you ever have to go to an interview and the interviewer asks you to show you github account, then just ask them why version control is important in the environment of the company you’re getting hired for. Versions begin with Alpha, Beta and 1.0 releases. Then there are minors like 1.5, 1.8 1.9 and majors like 2.0, 3.0 and so on. However one of my former employers was managed by managers that no clue on what means and their product versions are now the year and month. For example 1808 (August of 2020) and 2002 (February of 2020). What people ‘think’ are common goal concepts have completely been undone by self important management who abuse Agile. Basically, this particular segment of education is good if you’re diligent developer as a sole entity, but in reality the stuff that they’re making up in corporations really does not follow this model. Yes, Agile exists. Jira exists. Definition of Done exists but sadly version control or “git” as a standard isn’t what you’d expect it to be.

1 Like

I got kind of warm feeling when I saw how @ivan starts this video with a typo … we are all humans after all …

1 Like

I believe that a fast Googling session will actually help you sort out the difference between “version control” and git.
It has nothing to do with “lazy americans” and while git is one specific implementation of a version control, not every version control is (even similar) to git. Additionally today git is the “de-facto” standard in version control so it would be worth to invest learning it and the whole ecosystem around it. It is really helpful.
:slight_smile: