Integrity and Transparency (Accounting and Cyber Security Example)

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I currently work for a company that is accumulating large amounts of data pertaining to law enforcement and crime. One thing constantly on my mind regarding Integrity and Transparency is the initial Integrity and Transparency which will build the BC. The Blockchain, or anything else for that matter, will only be as integrious as the consciousness(programmer, individual, or group) creating the Blockchain. If not, it will be like creating a beast.

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Because public blockchains are open-source, they would be vetted by many unbiased programmers. So if there is anything fishy in the code, it would probably get sniffed out early.

If the blockchain really has potential and has a lot of value-add, there could always be a hard-fork to separate the “beast” version from the “honest” version. Without any nodes supporting the “beast” version, it would become obsolete very quickly.

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Greetings and I appreciate your response,

Your point about bias made me think of the inherent bias within any given social structure. How can the fishiness be detected if it is the norm within a society?

Maybe biases inherently exist in social structures, but how can these stakeholders act on a bias? In general, by exercising judgment or through manipulation. Code, however, is black-and-white.

By having unbiased/independent third parties vetting the code, it should be possible to identify where any fishy “favoritism” is embedded. There’s no judgment in computer code.

The issue where biases may impact a result is if there is an Oracle (person/group of people inputting information into the blockchain) or if it is a private blockchain with centralized governance.

Who writes the code?

Any company or individual programmer

@ivan talked about the importance of having a distributed consensus for company accounting/record-keeping, instead of centralized IT infrastructure. Which services currently exist that offer blockchain accounting, and which do you recommend?

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Really good response. Totally agree

Quick question just to confirm. Ivan is basically saying that the blockchain replaces the SQL data base and the excel file (or more specifically the hash of the excel file) is stored on the blockchain, so the only way for a hacker to maliciously alter the code would be a 51% atttack correct?

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Correct, blockchain itself is just a database, with some great features like inmutable data, increase the security of the data, create a more transparency way for the provenance of the data through hashing encryption, easy to share/verify.

Hope this gives you a clear picture of the subject.
If you have any more questions, please let us know so we can help you! :slight_smile:

Carlos Z.

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Hi
How vital is it to know the database section very well to your fingertips? I got the impression that I just need to have a general feeling of centralized databases so i have a general impression of the flaws. If I’m mistaken here, can anyone correct me?

If you want to manage some kind of project that require different type of databases, the knowledge about the features and disadvantage of each is a must known. So I could advice to try to learn the fundamentals of each, MySQL, NoSQL, Blockchains, consensus, API to share data between different servers with different databases but depends on other server to function properly. Just to give you some kind of example.

If you have any more questions, please let us know so we can help you! :slight_smile:

Carlos Z.

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Not everyone has the same motivations. All hackers are not united in motive, because Blockchain can be attacked from all sides it’s defenses must be unbiased. I think this is what gives blockchain potential ability of being very secure. Any backdoor will be instantly exploited. A current problem in markets is bots front running trades.

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